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Sioux Falls Free Thinkers endorse Passing Poston for showing that
most of these people were American citizens. They were imprisoned
for one reason, they were Japanese. They lost everything they
ever owned. Businesses, homes, bank accounts, all belongings
except one suitcase, and they were never compensated.

Passing Poston
An American Story

Passing Poston (2008) - 105 minutes
Passing Poston at Amazon.com

For the tens of thousands of Japanese Americans forcibly interned during World War II, the scars have never healed.

During World War II, almost 120,000 Japanese and Japanese-Americans were forcibly relocated and spent the war years in one of ten interment camps located in some of the nation's most inhospitable and desolate places. One such camp, situated on an Indian Reservation on the Arizona desert, was the Poston Relocation Center.

Weaving personal stories and moving archival footage. Passing Poston tells the untold story of how Japanese internees were used by the US government to help develop an impoverished Native American reservation. It is the story of four former Poston internees still searching for their identity and still questioning what their place is in America. For Ruth Okimoto, the need to confront the past brings her back to the desert of Arizona where she spent her childhood years behind barbed wire. It is a journey Ruth takes to find meaning as she searches to discover the true story of how the Poston camp came into being.

Directed by award-winning journalists Joe Fox and James Nubile, Passing Poston is a powerful and haunting story that gives voice to the internees' alienation and dislocation and holds a powerful lesson for the post 9-11 world in which we live.

12-26-16 How Pearl Harbor changed Japanese-Americans
How Pearl Harbor changed Japanese-Americans
The attack on Pearl Harbor shaped the lives of Japanese-Americans long after World War Two ended. As Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe visits Hawaii, the internment and treatment of Japanese-Americans during the war continues to resonate in today's political landscape. When US President Barack Obama and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe stood together in Hiroshima in late May, they made history: President Obama became the first sitting US president to visit the site of the US atomic bomb attack. On Tuesday they are set to reunite for another historic visit - Pearl Harbor. When Japanese attacked the US naval base on 7 December 1941, the rest of the world was already at war. Shortly after, the US joined the Allied forces. More than 50 million soldiers and civilians were killed, making it the deadliest military conflict in history. But after Pearl Harbor there were consequences for another group: American citizens of Japanese ancestry. "The Japanese race is an enemy race," wrote Lieutenant General John DeWitt in Final Report, Japanese Evacuation from the West Coast, 1942. "While many second and third generation Japanese born on American soil, possessed of American citizenship, have become 'Americanized,' the racial strains are undiluted." In February 1942, President Franklin Roosevelt issued Executive Order 9066, sending 120,000 people from the US west coast into internment camps because of their ethnic background. Two-thirds of them were born in America. Exclusion orders were posted in California, directing removal of persons of Japanese ancestry. (Webmaster's comment: And in Racist America this could happen again for almost any reason, but mostly because of all the haters and losers in America and their deep feelings of inadequacy.)

8-31-16 Gallup Vault: WWII-Era Support for Japanese Internment
Gallup Vault: WWII-Era Support for Japanese Internment
In December 1942, a year after Japan bombed Pearl Harbor and several months after Japanese-Americans living on the West Coast were subsequently "relocated" inland to U.S. detention camps, 48% of Americans believed the detainees should not be allowed to return to the Pacific coast after the war. Just 35% of Americans said they should be allowed to go back. (Webmaster's comment: American's tolerance for other nationalities has never been very good.)


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Passing Poston
An American Story

Sioux Falls Free Thinkers endorse Passing Poston for showing that
most of these people were American citizens. They were imprisoned
for one reason, they were Japanese. They lost everything they
ever owned. Businesses, homes, bank accounts, all belongings
except one suitcase, and they were never compensated.